Program

Institute Flyer / Schedule at a Glance / Handouts

The Texas Society of Addiction Medicine has released its schedule for its first Texas Interdisciplinary Addiction Institute scheduled for July 29-31 at the Omni Colonnade in San Antonio.

The Institute has tracks on prevention, treatment and recovery, as well as ethics and HIV. It is designed to provide the latest evidence-based information on a variety of topics as well as provide counselors and healthcare providers with continuing education credit.

Although the Institute is only three full days, it seeks to provide the maximum continuing education contact hours through pre-conference workshops, evening classes and early morning riser sessions.

 

Sunday, July 29th

9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Ethics for the Prevention Profession

Pre-Conference: Prevention

Julie Stevens, MPS, ACPS, ICPS | Prevention Training Services

Ethics for the Prevention Profession is designed specifically for the substance abuse prevention professional. This workshop is intended to improve the understanding of and ability to apply a set of accepted standards/principles that guide the behaviors and actions of both individuals and organizations working in the prevention profession. The principles in the Prevention Think Tank Code of Ethical Conduct articulate the prevention professional’s recognition of responsibilities to the public, to service recipients, and to colleagues. This workshop will introduce a decision-making model which will assist the prevention professional in making difficult ethical decisions.

 

Crossroads: Integrating Harm Reduction Techniques and Education into Substance Use Treatment

Pre-Conference: Treatment

Justin McClenny, LCDC | HIV Connection

This workshop provides additional tools for a provider to better address the structural, biomedical, and behavioral change aspects of drug and alcohol use and the high-risk sexual behaviors of clients. This course acknowledges that different communities may find some tools more or less useful than others as they work with diverse clients around these challenging issues.

 

Clinical Supervision in Times of Rapid Change

Pre-Conference: Counseling Essentials

D. Shane Koch, RhD, CRC, CAADC | College of Education and Human Services, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

This workshop provides additional tools for a provider to better address the structural, biomedical, and behavioral change aspects of drug and alcohol use and the high-risk sexual behaviors of clients. This course acknowledges that different communities may find some tools more or less useful than others as they work with diverse clients around these challenging issues.

 

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Welcome /Opening Remarks

Carlos Tirado, MD, MPH, FABAM | ABRI

Dr. Carlos Tirado, President of Texas Society of Addiction Medicine will welcome the attendees and give opening remarks for the first Texas Interdisciplinary Addiction Institute.

 

Are You Ready? The Future of Addictions Treatment in America

Opening Keynote

Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC | On The Mark Consulting

Diverse changes in key areas are influencing the future of addictions treatment in America. The list is exhaustive and includes but is certainly not limited to: increased life expectancy; technology erasing millions of jobs in America; demographic and geographic shifts; gender shifts in wage earning; the need for more trauma-informed services; the use of technology in counseling including recovery apps and robots; and the shift toward evidence-based practices. There are also a growing list of needs regarding recovery: to honor multiple pathways of recovery; to anchor recovery in the natural environment; and to grow the recovery school movement. And, of course, there will be the need to explore nontraditional sources of funding, as well as to address staff turnover and leadership voids.

 

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Social Determinants of Mental Health

Prevention

Julie Stevens, MPS, ACPS, ICPS | Prevention Training Services

An examination of the social determinants of mental health reveals that some persons are at risk of mental illness and substance use disorders because of unfavorable social, economic and environmental circumstances. These disadvantages are cumulative, beginning at birth and remaining throughout life. The World Health Organization has published key findings and recommendations to bring awareness to the issue of social health disparities. This workshop will discuss the interacting forces that help shape individual and population-level mental health and well-being, including employment, food, access to and quality of health care, education, income, environment, social isolation, housing, and adverse childhood experiences. Social health disparities can extend across the life-span, beginning with exposure to risk factors from formative stages and decades beyond. The World Health Organization proposes that actions and policies addressing the problem need to be universal and inclusive, yet proportional to the need. This workshop will discuss the key messages and actions to reduce the risk of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders proposed by the World Health Organization and other resources.

 

Slipping Through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients with Multiple Addictions and Disorders

Treatment

Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC | On The Mark Consulting

If it were not for the miracle of recovery, addictions counseling could be quite frustrating. Thirty percent of clients are no-shows at their first session. For those who make their first session, 50 percent miss their second session. Even those who complete treatment are vulnerable to slip through the cracks. This often includes chronic recidivism, and going back and forth between addictions treatment, the criminal justice system, child welfare system, mental health treatment, back to addictions treatment and prison without fully recovering. Many clients are vulnerable to slip through the cracks due to hidden psychiatric disorders, criminal thinking, unresolved trauma, unresolved grief, addiction to a drug sub-culture, addictive relationships, process addictions and an ineffective service dose.

 

Working with Families and Veterans Before, During, and After Deployment

Recovery

D. Shane Koch, RhD, CRC, CAADC | College of Education and Human Services, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Veterans returning from service in this time of war are facing unique challenges and injuries. This session looks at the most common types of injuries sustained during war in the Gulf Region and the increased risk these soldiers face in developing a substance abuse disorder. The signature injury, Traumatic Brain Injury combined with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, as well as other common injuries sustained by vets have a significant link to substance use disorders. This session explores the injuries and contributing factors putting war veterans at risk for developing substance abuse disorders.

 

Just the Basics: HIV and Substance Use

Counseling Essentials

Justin McClenny, LCDC | HIV Connection

By the end of this course, participants will be able to list three connections between substance use and sexually transmitted diseases (HIV), and describe four behaviors that eliminate or reduce the risk of contracting an HIV. This training also reviews facts counselors need to know related to Sexually Transmitted Infections and helping their clients remain healthy.

 

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Networking Reception with Presenters and Exhibitors

 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Humor in Self-Care and Recovery

Evening Session

Frances Patterson, PhD, LADAC, MAC | Footprints Consulting Services, LLC

Helping professionals often become so involved in their work that they forget about their own mental health. As a result, they may become stressed to the point of burnout. At that point they are of little benefit to clients or co-workers. Part of this involves losing our sense of humor. The forefathers of our professions knew well the part that humor plays in therapy. This keynote will address how counselors can use humor appropriately, and, in the process, become more effective in their work with clients. Dr. Patterson will discuss humor in terms of the whole person. The need for humor in all aspects of our lives and why it is important in counseling clients has they begin their journey of recovery. Through the use of humor and a multimedia approach, Dr. Patterson will present a fun and engaging session.

 

 

Monday, July 30th


7:15 am - 8:15 am

We Are the Instruments

Early Morning Riser Session

James Campbell, LPC, CAC II, MAC | Family Excellence Inc.

In the midst of an emphasis on evidence-based practices and outcome measures it can be easy to lose sight of the fact that clinicians are the route of administration for effective treatment. It is people and not practices that are restorative; and if we would assist others in in finding their path towards healing and recovery, we must carefully attend our own hearts as the instruments of transformation.

 

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Community Response to the Opioid Crisis

Prevention

Julie Stevens, MPS, ACPS, ICPS | Prevention Training Services

The opioid epidemic has caught the country off guard, draining resources which were designed to address the problem. Alarmed federal and state agencies are scrambling to address the problem. States blame the pharmaceutical companies that have, since the 1980s, promoted opioids as a panacea for relieving pain. There is a strain on law enforcement, county officials, health care providers and social service agencies. But it is the communities that have borne the brunt of the opioid crisis. This workshop discusses how communities can take action. Strategies such as creating coalitions and drug task forces, developing policies, creating drug disposal sites, and training first responders are just some of the approaches a community can take. Attendees will also discuss the Federal response to the Opioid Crisis.

 

Are You Playing With All Your Marbles?

Prevention

Robert Landry, EdD | Research and Educational Services

This presentation related to evaluation of prevention programs utilizes an exercise-based random selection from a nonsensical population to demonstrate the probability of occurrence. The exercise also displays the variance of local population and how this expression affects outcomes. The exercise is designed to demonstrate data collection design and outcome differences. The exercise is for novice evaluators or those interested in evaluation with little experience. The presentation is light hearted and provides a generic overview of evaluation.

 

Effective Treatment Planning For Addiction Counseling

Treatment

Zachary Hansen, EdD, LADC, NCC | Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies

Treatment planning is a critical, but often overlooked, component to providing effective treatment. In this session, participants will learn how to create effective treatment plans by taking on a collaborative approach, considering the client’s level of motivation, and effectively organizing the plan. We will emphasize a person-centered approach to treatment planning, which is compatible with all treatment approaches.

 

Honest, Open Proud: Strategic Disclosure for People with Substance Use Disorder

Recovery

Patrick Corrigan, PsyD | Illinois Institute of Technology

The stigma of substance use disorder (SUD) may be as harmful as the disorder itself. Strategic disclosure is one way to help people deal with SUD stigma. Honest, Open, Proud (HOP) is an evidence-based approach to promoting strategic disclosure. The purpose of this project is to conduct community based participatory research (CBPR) to adapt HOP for SUD. CBPR is a prominent approach to public health that engages people with SUD in all phases of program development and evaluation.

 

HIV and Trauma Informed Care in the LGBTQI Community

Counseling Essentials

Jeff Zacharias, LCSW, CSAT, CAADC, BRI-I | New Hope Recovery Center

This session offers an overview HIV and Trauma Informed Care in the LGBTQI Community. The session aims are to help attendees understand the disproportionate prevalence of trauma and stress-related disorders among HIV-positive MSM, recognize the relationship of trauma to overall health and decreased engagement in primary care among HIV-positive MSM. This session will include promising practices in trauma-informed care to improve engagement of HIV-positive MSM in behavioral health and primary care.

 

10:15 am - 11:45 am

Teens and Compassion

Prevention

Karen Williams, MSSW | Williams Group

Robert Sapolsky of Stanford says, “Because youth are all about building their brains, you can multiply what you know about how stress affects the adult brain by 10-fold when talking about youth ages 10 to 20.” Start with the fact that the teen brain is about half-way developed when massive neural pruning robs its basic thinking abilities, and then new neural territory is opened for new development, which alters the flow of blood and energy. Then add the body-morphing and hormonal changes of puberty, the increased dose and duration of cortisol, which makes it more difficult to calm down, plus the boredom that comes from having a brain that is racing 50-80 times faster than the adult brain, and finally, add three new drives. "Do the math" and you can get an idea of the distress of being “just a teen”. Then - - for at least 50 percent of teens, add the trauma that results from family adversity - - coupled with a lack of coping and stress-management and adult support - - and you have the basic ingredients of massive vulnerability. This workshop covers the basics for adding compassion to prevention, intervention, and treatment.

 

A Review of Evidence-Based Pain Management and Therapeutic Options to Prevent Opioid Addiction

Prevention

Graves Owen, MD | Texas Pain Foundation

During the last several decades, physicians have witnessed an increased emphasis on the assessment and treatment of pain. Unfortunately, for many practitioners there remains a great deal of confusion as to what constitutes appropriate care for the patient experiencing chronic pain. This session will discuss the role of physical rehabilitation, pain psychology, pharmacotherapy, and procedural interventions in the treatment of chronic pain. Given the current epidemic of drug-related deaths, particular emphasis is placed on the alternatives to opioid therapy.

 

Clinical Intuition In Alcohol And Drug Counseling

Treatment

Zachary Hansen, EdD, LADC, NCC | Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies

Clinical intuition is a commonly experienced phenomenon among mental health and addiction counselors. However, it is not often overtly addressed in counselor education and training. By integrating theory, neuroscience, and research findings, this session will provide an overview of clinical intuition. Then research-based best practice recommendations will be highlighted to provide participants with guidelines to effectively utilize clinical intuition in their work. The presenter will integrate findings from his phenomenological research on clinical intuition among alcohol and drug counselors to provide clinically relevant examples and recommendations.

 

Engaging Families in Treatment and Recovery

Recovery

James Campbell, LPC, CAC II, MAC | Family Excellence Inc.

Families have a tremendous impact on individuals with an addiction. All too often we know this to be true, and yet very few treatment programs effectively engage families and treat the family system as a whole. Engaging Families in Recovery is a look at addiction as a family disease as well as recovery as a family process. Special emphasis is placed on how to engage families in treatment as well as effective interventions with families.

 

The Ethical Path: Navigating Technology Issues, Dual Relationships and Professional Responsibility

Counseling Essentials

Frances Patterson, PhD, LADAC, MAC | Footprints Consulting Services, LLC

Ethics is much more than just "the law." Therapists regularly encounter ethical dilemmas that are not as clearly defined, and they must be informed in order to make sound decisions. During this session, participants will examine how personal values help to determine professional conduct, and the reasons that professionals make ethical mistakes. Dr. Patterson will also focus on the issue of cultural competency, as she reveals what cultural issues the therapists, as well as the clients, bring into a therapy session. Participants will use case examples to encourage self-exploration and practice determining appropriate courses of action.

 

11:45 am - 1:15 pm - Extra Fee to Attend

Addressing the Stigma of Substance Use and Mental Illness

Luncheon Keynote

Patrick Corrigan, PsyD | Illinois Institute of Technology

Previous research has shown that people labeled with drug addiction are viewed as more blameworthy and dangerous compared to individuals labeled with mental illness who, in turn, are viewed more harshly than those with physical disabilities. Endorsement of such stereotypes often lead to less helping behavior and more avoidance of people with drug addiction compared to those with mental illness. This session will identify the costs and benefits of disclosing one's experience with SUD in order to deal with the public and self-stigma of SUD.

 

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

The Power of Calm: Overcoming Distress, Anxiety & Trauma (Part 1)

Prevention

Karen Williams, MSSW | Williams Group

Neuroscience has revealed that unmitigated distress, anxiety and trauma can not only affect behavior, learning, and development, they can stimulate chemical changes that if left unmitigated, can result in life-long health problems. However, science has also shown that when we learn how to self-regulate our chemistry, we can prevent, interrupt, mitigate - and even reverse -  the harm from childhood adversity, regardless of whether or not we can identify or impact its source. Most exciting is the research that shows that just by adding simple daily coping and stress management practices we can effect significant positive changes in child and youth behavior, learning and development. The session will also discuss mirror neurons, how temperament influences one’s sensitivity to discomfort, how our vagus nerve and our “second brain” impact our mental health, how chemical homeostasis works, and how neuroplasticity means that it is never too late to effect meaningful change.

 

The Role of Efficacy in Prevention

Prevention

Robert Landry, EdD | Research and Educational Services

The presentation is related to the work of Social Psychologist. The work of Albert Bandura and how it impacts the delivery of Prevention program both at the individual level and the Community level. His work also includes Social Learning Theory which is directly related to the development of youth behavior. The presentation will unveil how incorporation of these theories improve the success of both prevention and treatment.

 

Therapeutic Care of Opioid Affected Mother-Infant Dyads

Treatment

Lisa Cleveland, PhD, RN, PNP-BC, IBCLC | University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Attend this session to receive an overview of substance use in women and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) covering the following: overview of substance use in women; role of trauma; screening for substance use in pregnant women; management of substance use disorder in this population; NAS & management; and legal aspects. The session will also include research findings of UT San Antonio.

 

Adolescents and Substance Use: Filling in the Gaps

Recovery

Virginia Hoft, LCDC | Santa Fe Youth Services, Youth Advocate Program

Substance use strategies are often limited to two opposite poles –  drug education or drug treatment. However, many young people fall outside of this cohort, because substance use varies for young people along a continuum including: their current level of use, from risky to chaotic; their understanding of the consequences of substance use; and their motivation to change their behavior. Substance use strategies that address these variety of needs are critical for more responsive services and successful outcomes for young people. This workshop will discuss best practices that are aligned with National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA) Principles of Adolescent Substance Use Interventions and help to meet youth “where they are,” instead of “where we want them to be.”   

 

Chemsex in the City: The Intersection of Drugs, Sex, Technology and HIV/AIDS

Counseling Essentials

Jeff Zacharias, LCSW, CSAT, CAADC, BRI-I | New Hope Recovery Center

The LGBT community has been impacted by HIV for many years and nowhere has this been felt more than with our clients, who are addicted to multiple substances and behaviors, develop sexual compulsivity issues potentially addictive in nature and have deep layers of trauma. Addiction, while always present in the LGBT community even prior to the advent of HIV/AIDS, has been steadily on the rise for many years particularly in younger persons of color. What is becoming more evident with addiction is that it’s not only substances or alcohol but process addictions such as sexual compulsivity, which are acting in tandem with each other. Trauma and co-occurring mental health issues, if left unchecked, will only serve to exacerbate the complications that arise from addiction and sexual compulsivity. This fusion of sex and drug known as chemsex, along with treatment protocols such as PrEP, are resulting in an uptick of the occurrence of HIV/AIDS. This presentation will look at the interplay of sex, drugs and HIV/AIDS as well as examine best treatment protocols to address best success with our clients.

 

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

The Power of Calm: Overcoming Distress, Anxiety & Trauma (Part 2)

Prevention

Karen Williams, MSSW | Williams Group

Neuroscience has revealed that unmitigated distress, anxiety and trauma can not only affect behavior, learning, and development, they can stimulate chemical changes that if left unmitigated, can result in life-long health problems. However, science has also shown that when we learn how to self-regulate our chemistry, we can prevent, interrupt, mitigate - and even reverse -  the harm from childhood adversity, regardless of whether or not we can identify or impact its source. Most exciting is the research that shows that just by adding simple daily coping and stress management practices we can effect significant positive changes in child and youth behavior, learning and development. The session will also discuss mirror neurons, how temperament influences one’s sensitivity to discomfort, how our vagus nerve and our “second brain” impact our mental health, how chemical homeostasis works, and how neuroplasticity means that it is never too late to effect meaningful change.

 

Operation Naloxone: Opioid Overdose Prevention in Texas

Prevention

Lucas Hill, PharmD, BCPS, BCACP | The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy

Operation Naloxone is funded by a grant program from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) aimed at addressing the opioid crisis by increasing access to treatment, reducing unmet treatment need, and reducing opioid (heroin and non-medical pain relievers) overdose-related deaths through the provision of prevention, treatment, and recovery activities for opioid use disorder, which includes both prescription opioids as well as illicit drugs. The session will provide epidemiological and clinical background regarding the project. Strategies implemented at The University of Texas will be reviewed, including naloxone distribution and overdose response education. Resources for professional development and overdose prevention program support will be provided.

 

Recovery Transformation Efforts: Removing Stigma and Becoming a ROSC

Recovery

Abigail Moore | SACADA

This session will focus on the findings of the Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health focusing on recovery best practices. As noted in the report, the recovery movement offers a valuable opportunity for people with substance use disorders and their loved ones to get the support they need to gradually return to a healthy and productive life away from the destructive impact of substance use. The movement also provides an opportunity for people to advocate for improvements in prevention and treatment services. This movement can contribute to efforts to reduce negative public attitudes as well as discrimination embedded in public policies and the health care system. Participates will review the what is a Recovery Oriented System of Care (ROSC), what the goals are and how to ensure communities continue to become recovery oriented.

 

Cultural Considerations in the Therapeutic Environment

Counseling Essentials

Frances Patterson, PhD, LADAC, MAC | Footprints Consulting Services, LLC

On a daily basis, behavioral health professionals have the opportunity to learn about the cultures of those with whom they work, either as clients, coworkers or colleagues. Cultural competence or proficiency is about learning, exploring, and respect of differences. Through this session, participants will have the opportunity to examine culture and the impact it has during therapeutic sessions. They will be offered some thought provoking ideas concerning how to improve their cultural awareness. Discussion will include cultural issues addressed in the DSM 5.

 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Ethics and Ethical Decision Models

Evening Session

D. Shane Koch, RhD, CRC, CAADC | College of Education and Human Services, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Ethical decision-making is an evolving science. Increased attention is being paid to organizational variables, the introduction of measures of moral intensity, reconsideration of traditional principle-based decision-making models, and the introduction of complex, critical thinking models as an alternative to static ethical formulas. This presentation will compare and contrast ethical systems and explore how professionals may use appropriate critical thinking to identify and resolve ethical challenges and dilemmas.

 

 

Tuesday, July 31st


7:15 am - 8:15 am

Attitudes, Beliefs, and Values: Impact of Media on Prevention, Treatment & Recovery

Early Morning Riser Session

D. Shane Koch, RhD, CRC, CAADC | College of Education and Human Services, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Are the media the "root of all evils" or potentially part of the solution? Do the media contribute to societal ills like smoking, alcoholism, and drug use, violence, obesity? Does Hollywood merely "mirror" society or do media actually cause changes in behavior? This session will delve into what current media look like, how children and teens use both traditional and newer media, how media affect young people in both positive and negative ways, and what YOU can do about it! Many video clips and humorous cartoons will be used to show the content of current media and how it may affect children and adolescents both positively and negatively. Health professionals and parents will learn what the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends for children and teens and how to take control of the media and use it wisely for their patients and their children.

 

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Engaging Youth in Advocating for Change

Prevention

Georgianne Crowell, MPH | Texans Standing Tall
Anthony Cortez | Texans Standing Tall Youth Leadership Council

Youth’s involvement in community advocacy is key to effective decision making and positive community outcomes. The focus of this presentation is to provide best practices for engaging youth in community and state level prevention efforts. For coalitions, youth engagement in advocacy means partnering with youth to make positive changes versus making decisions on their behalf or only providing services to them. Engaging this population not only benefits the individual youth who learn to be engaged civic leaders, it also benefits organizations and communities as a whole who can increase their sustainability and the overall success of their goals. Participants will learn how to collaborate with youth effectively in order to prevent underage substance use and create safer communities as well as learn the youth’s perspective on advocating for change.

 

Today's Drug Trend: Interactive Training and Alternative Activities

Prevention

Michelle Young, LMSW, ACPS | University of Texas Arlington Center for Addiction and Recovery Studies
Haydee Hall, LMSW, ACPS | Center for Addiction and Recovery Studies, University of Texas at Arlington School of Social Work

This presentation will educate prevention educators on current drugs trends youth consider safe, such as e-cigarettes, Hookahs, and synthetic drugs. The presentation will also cover the second and third hand effects these drugs as well as alcohol and tobacco can have on children. The goal is to educate young people and adults about the dangers posed by drugs and alcohol and change the behaviors that may lead to abuse. Knowledge about the dangers of drugs and alcohol is certainly a factor in prevention, but it is only a beginning. Recipients of prevention education need to incorporate that knowledge into their own lives and decision-making processes. This is better accomplished through hands-on activities. This presentation will address comprehensive and exciting ways to incorporate current drug trend education (electronic cigarettes, synthetic drugs, alcohol, and tobacco) with fun, interactive alternative activities to engage youth and adults. Participants will learn various alternative activities they can use in their own programs.

 

Alcohol, Drugs and Aging: A 21st Century Challenge

Treatment

D. Shane Koch, RhD, CRC, CAADC | College of Education and Human Services, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

The demographic makeup of the United States is changing with a shift towards a growing elderly population. With Baby Boomers moving into retirement, trends in substance abuse and addiction amongst older adults is increasing at alarming rates. This workshop will explore the unique issues of substance abuse and treatment as it relates to older adults. We will explore trends in aging, the unique effects of drugs (illicit, prescription, and alcohol) on the aging body, and unique treatment needs of older adults who require clinical or medical intervention for any type of substance abuse or addiction. The session will explore demographic trends in aging in the nation and become familiar with two age cohorts, the "Good Warriors," and the "Baby Boomers."

 

Recovery Residences: Is This a Very, Very, Very Fine House?

Recovery

George Braucht, LPC, CPCS | Brauchtworks Consulting

Recovery residences are vital components of recovery-oriented systems of care. Blending acute care treatment with the social model of recovery, this session reviews the national Standard and associated best practices for operators, referral sources and National Alliance for Recovery Residences’ Affiliates that certify recovery residences.

 

10:15 am - 11:45 am

Motivating the Motivators: Reassess Your Motivation and Rediscover Your Wisdom for a Richer and More Rewarding Professional Life

Closing Keynote

Paul Nagy, MS, LPC, LCAS, CCS | Duke University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

The addictions counseling profession is known to be stressful, offering limited recognition and reward. One recent study found that one in three substance abuse counselors and one in four clinical supervisors in a national sample of 27 treatment organizations left their jobs in the course of a single year (Eby, 2010). Although worksite factors are known to be a leading cause of burnout and attrition, there is also evidence that an enhanced sense of values awareness can predict professional retention. In this session, participants will have the opportunity to revisit their reasons for entering the field and the values that motivated their careers. The presenter will also offer his reflections on lessons learned from a three-decade career as a clinical addictions specialist to explain his own career perspective. This session holds an opportunity for participants to assess the potential impact of values awareness on their professional motivation.

 

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

The Colors of Prevention (Part 1)

Prevention

Mitchell Moore, LCDC, ACPS, SAP, ADC, BAT | MBM Enterprises

Community based prevention is similar to taking a journey. Before we begin we need to know: where we are starting from (assessment); where we are going (results); and how we are going to get there (planning). The Strategic Prevention Framework is a five-step planning process framework designed to help communities deliver effective prevention practices. A logic model is a visual representation of the initiative's activities, outputs, and expected outcomes and a comprehensive prevention plan will keep the program on track to produce positive results. Plan your work, work your plan. Change the environment before the environment changes you.

 

It Takes a Village: Understanding and Treating Adolescent Substance Use (Part 1)

Treatment

Paul Nagy, MS, LPC, LCAS, CCS | Duke University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Engaging and treating adolescents with substance use disorders and their families presents many challenges including the increasing acuity and complexity of the problem and a limited array of service delivery options and evidence based treatments. This presentation will provide an overview of current trends and perspectives on adolescent substance use disorders as well as a review of effective screening, assessment and engagement strategies for the adolescent and his family. An overview of evidence based interventions as well as a systems based intensive outpatient model of treatment will be presented. Case presentation and discussion will allow participants to address real world challenges and opportunities.

 

Expect Recovery/Resilience: Applying the Science of Addiction Recovery and Positive Psychology (Part 1)

Recovery

George Braucht, LPC, CPCS | Brauchtworks Consulting

Trauma-informed clinical services are buoyed by focusing on resilience or recovery. Blending acute care and social models of recovery with positive psychology’s evidence-based principles and practices, this training’s goal is to foster habits of engaging in compassionate conversations with equanimity that promote wellness in oneself and others.

 

Ethical Knowledge and Personal Awareness: Becoming a More Ethical Clinician (Part 1)

Counseling Essentials

Eric Schmidt, PhD, LPC-S | Texas State University

Knowledge of ethics, ethical decisions, and ethical behaviors are crucial for effective clinical practice for all in the helping professions. Often, clinicians are aware of ethical codes and laws regarding practice, but fail to consider how best to implement those ethical and legal principles. Furthermore, clinicians may sometimes fail to understand how to integrate personal values and beliefs with ethical practice and expectations. This presentation will consist of two parts: 1) intentionally and accurately applying a code of ethics to actual ethical dilemmas to help ensure attendees make ethical decisions and demonstrate ethical behaviors; and 2) providing attendees with seven basic assumptions that speak to how personal beliefs and knowledge impact how they adhere to and express ethical clinical practice. In short, by attending this presentation, attendees will develop both a greater understanding of how to apply codes of ethics, as well as a deeper awareness of their personal relationship to and understanding of professional ethics.

 

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

The Colors of Prevention (Part 2)

Prevention

Mitchell Moore, LCDC, ACPS, SAP, ADC, BAT | MBM Enterprises

Community based prevention is similar to taking a journey. Before we begin we need to know: where we are starting from (assessment); where we are going (results); and how we are going to get there (planning). The Strategic Prevention Framework is a five-step planning process framework designed to help communities deliver effective prevention practices. A logic model is a visual representation of the initiative's activities, outputs, and expected outcomes and a comprehensive prevention plan will keep the program on track to produce positive results. Plan your work, work your plan. Change the environment before the environment changes you.

 

It Takes a Village: Understanding and Treating Adolescent Substance Use (Part 2)

Treatment

Paul Nagy, MS, LPC, LCAS, CCS | Duke University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Engaging and treating adolescents with substance use disorders and their families presents many challenges including the increasing acuity and complexity of the problem and a limited array of service delivery options and evidence based treatments. This presentation will provide an overview of current trends and perspectives on adolescent substance use disorders as well as a review of effective screening, assessment and engagement strategies for the adolescent and his family. An overview of evidence based interventions as well as a systems based intensive outpatient model of treatment will be presented. Case presentation and discussion will allow participants to address real world challenges and opportunities.

 

Expect Recovery/Resilience: Applying the Science of Addiction Recovery and Positive Psychology (Part 2)

Recovery

George Braucht, LPC, CPCS | Brauchtworks Consulting

Trauma-informed clinical services are buoyed by focusing on resilience or recovery. Blending acute care and social models of recovery with positive psychology’s evidence-based principles and practices, this training’s goal is to foster habits of engaging in compassionate conversations with equanimity that promote wellness in oneself and others.

 

Ethical Knowledge and Personal Awareness: Becoming a More Ethical Clinician (Part 2)

Counseling Essentials

Eric Schmidt, PhD, LPC-S | Texas State University

Knowledge of ethics, ethical decisions, and ethical behaviors are crucial for effective clinical practice for all in the helping professions. Often, clinicians are aware of ethical codes and laws regarding practice, but fail to consider how best to implement those ethical and legal principles. Furthermore, clinicians may sometimes fail to understand how to integrate personal values and beliefs with ethical practice and expectations. This presentation will consist of two parts: 1) intentionally and accurately applying a code of ethics to actual ethical dilemmas to help ensure attendees make ethical decisions and demonstrate ethical behaviors; and 2) providing attendees with seven basic assumptions that speak to how personal beliefs and knowledge impact how they adhere to and express ethical clinical practice. In short, by attending this presentation, attendees will develop both a greater understanding of how to apply codes of ethics, as well as a deeper awareness of their personal relationship to and understanding of professional ethics.